THE YURT

The yurt is large and spacious – 18ft in diameter. The design has been adapted to accommodate Westerners who tend to be taller than Mongolians. The central crown has a clear canopy which means that guests can drift off to sleep after gazing at the stars, and open their eyes in the morning to see blue skies and clouds.

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THE YURT SITE

The yurt is furnished with a mix of antiques – Georgian, Victorian, and Edwardian. My sister said that this must be what camping felt like in the days of the Indian Raj. The furniture includes a double bed, wardrobe, chest of drawers, table, two chairs, sofa, hat and coat stand, blanket box and marble topped washstand. And there’s still plenty of room to move around.

 

There is a cosy 5KW wood burning stove. The floor is covered with a circular hessian rug overlaid with a number of Turkish style rugs.

 

On the washstand you’ll find an electric kettle, electric toaster, and microwave oven.

 

Around the edge of the Yurt there are several electric sockets and USB ports, some of which power the electric lights within the yurt.

THE SMALLHOLDING

Hadrian’s Wall Yurt is set within a 26 acre smallholding.  It's reached from the B6318 (known locally as the military road) via a private unmade lane with glorious views over the North Tyne valley.

The smallholding contains two ancient quarries – the Lower Quarry and the Upper Quarry – both long since reclaimed by nature. The lower quarry is a Site of Special Scientific Interest because of the unique character of its limestone.  The Yurt is set in the top corner of the Upper Quarry and guests will have exclusive use of this secluded and completely private more than two acre site.

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In one of the fields you’ll pass on the way to the Yurt there is an ancient lime kiln, which is a listed building.

 

If you’d like to see the rest of the site please let me know and I’ll be happy to show you around. And if you’re interested I can introduce you to my chickens and rare breed sheep (Rylands and Shetlands).

 

While you are here you might well see buzzards flying high in the sky, wild rabbits, pheasants and a large variety of other birds.  You’ll probably also hear Tawny owls but you’re unlikely to see them.  If you’re lucky you might see deer, dragonflies and barn owls.  If you’re very lucky you might see hares and stouts.

 

And there are now Alpacas and pygmy goats in the field that guests will pass as they go to and from the site.

THE BIG PLAN

The Big Plan is for the income from the yurt to be invested in turning the smallholding into an informal nature reserve – contributing to the costs of planting trees, hedges (wildlife highways), wildflower meadows for pollinators, and building ponds.

We had such a good week at the yurt. It was in a fantastic position for visiting the area but also provided a very quiet, restful base. Thank you to Barry for making this little piece of Northumberland such a joy to visit. We'll be back.  -  Jill

The yurt is a perfect romantic hideaway, nestling in the beautiful Northumbrian landscape. The campfire provides a place to cook and dream a bit by the flames of the open fire surrounded by trees and birds. - Alison

Idilic break - just the right amount of nature vs luxury! The Yurt is large and beautifully furnished. Everything you could need for a self catering break is there for you. The Yurt site is beautiful and completely secluded with plenty of space. - Becky